Delilah BOM – Month 10

Hello everyone, here is a quick round up of Month 10 block – Mayflower .

 

No curves this month but we are back to having those pesky Y seams. Although you should all be experts by now I’m guessing!. Last time around I tried a mixture of hand sewing and machine sewing the Y seams. I’m not particularly great on the machine side so I wanted to really push myself this time.

I think I can say that by the time I had done all the blocks this month I was certainly more confident. It’s all about precision and pivoting, and a really good pressing with some flatter!

I actually quite like this block as there were not so many pieces to it and aside from the Y seam challenge they did all go together pretty quickly.

Even through the templates were a little delayed for this month and we all had the Christmas rush to deal with it was nice to see some blocks pop up online, and look at super Sue busting out all 9. Fab work.

Catch up soon for Justine’s round up of Month 11 and then can you believe it were nearly at the end of another BOM challenge.

Bring on 2018 and Golden Days Jen…

Happy sewing for now, Lisa x

Moda BOM Blocks 9-11

Hello! As promised here are our handy tips for blocks 9-11 for those of you participating in our Moda Building Blocks BOM.

Firstly, as always, once I have cut the required fabrics as per each block pattern I lay out the block.

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Block 9 layout

For some bizarre reason I really struggled with how I was going to sew the corners on this block! In my mind and please don’t ask me why, I only had one white triangle per corner not two, it wasn’t until I laid the block out and saw that there were two white triangles per corner did the penny drop!

Corner layout!

Corner layout!

Once you have sewn each of the four corners it is time to sew your rows together. As you would with any quilt block piece left to right making sure all your seams and points match up where necessary.

top row pieced

top row pieced

Once all three rows in the block are pieced and pressed well you can go ahead and sew the rows together to complete your block!

block 9 finished!

block 9 finished!

Once I had gotten over the ridiculous non-existent hurdle with the corners of this block I found it came together easily!

Now we’ll look at Block 10 which I’ve got to admit is my favourite of this months blocks! Again once all the required pieces have been cut, and please don’t forget to use a spray starch like Best Press or Flatter to help your fabrics maintain their shape and be crease free, layout the block.

Block 10 layout

Block 10 layout

Even though the layout here is not neat I can still see all the different elements that make up the block which in turn makes it easier to sew in a practical order.

Block 10 top row

Block 10 top row

The top row is made up of three elements that were simple enough to sew, the corners are very similar to block 9. The flying geese section in the middle is easy but I do have a couple of tips to help you on your way!

Instead of pinning all the bias cut triangles in these blocks I’ve been using a dab of my Sewline Glue Pen to secure them together. I worry that the use of pins will distort and stretch the fabric (because they are cut on the bias) and this will throw the block size out.

Fying Geese

Fying Geese

Here you can see how I have lined the triangles up to sew them. The overlap of fabric between the two triangles needs to be at the centre point of the peach fabric, this ensures that when you have sewn the other triangle on at the opposite side the point is sharp in the middle. I used a dab of glue to hold the triangles in place along the edge I would be sewing.

Once I had pieced the top and bottom rows which are the same, I tackled the centre section of the block.

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layout of block centre

In order to line the triangles up correctly on each side of the square I found the centre point of the side of the square and of the triangle and made a crease on each which I then lined up. Again I secured the two pieces with a dab of glue from my Sewline pen.

match up the creases before sewing!

match up the creases before sewing!

I repeated this process until all four white triangles had been attached to the four sides of the square. I used the same method of finding and aligning the centres when I sewed on the outer triangles too.

block 10 complete

block 10 complete

I love the colours in this block, they really pop!

Next up is Block 11 which is easily pieced compared to blocks 9 and 10! You’re simply sewing the strips of fabric together as the pattern indicates. Sew the 3 longer strips together of the centre section first and then sew the shorter strips into pairs, making sure the two shades of yellow are in the correct order as per the pattern!

block 11 pieced

block 11 pieced

The only tip I have for this part is to save you some maths!! The shorter strips need to be sewn 4″ in from the edge at the top and bottom to give the block as above. This is now ready for you to cut.

**** final part of instructions will be added as soon as I have got the photos edited!***

Iron or Press?

Iron or Press is a question on many people’s minds in the sewing community! Here in the UK we tend to iron which can have a massive impact on your sewn items and quilt blocks in particular. Lets look at why!

Ironing is the motion of gliding the iron over the fabric to smooth out wrinkles and puckers but it can stretch the fabric and skew the grain. It takes a lot of effort to iron as you apply pressure to the iron. When you press you use an up down motion, carefully setting the iron up and down across the fabric at regular intervals. This doesn’t require half as much effort as ironing does! So why is this important? Well as I mentoned earlier, ironing distorts fabric and pressing does not, which when you are working with fabrics that have raw edges when you are sewing, you really do not want to distort the fabric as this will have a hugely negative impact on the piece you are working on. Good pressing is the key!

  • Press fabrics before cutting for better accuracy
  • Always test your iron on a scrap piece before pressing new or delicate fabrics, you don’t want to scorch your treasured fabrics right?
  • Use a dry iron to press, that’s right NO steam! Steam distorts fabric which leads to inaccurate cutting & piecing
  • Don’t press over pin heads as they can melt into and ruin your fabric
  • Allow fabric to cool before handling, this protects your fingers as well as the fabric from distorting!
  • Use a starch free spray such as Best Press or Flatter to help remove creases and to hold seams

Using a strach spray is of course a personal preference, Lisa and I both swear by a starch free spray to help remove creases from fabric for both the shop and in our own sewing. We use either Best Press or Flatter and have found them to be equally as good, the difference been that Flatter has no synthetic ingredients and Best Press does.


If you’d like to give either Best Press or Flatter a whirl feel free to use code: iron10 for a cheeky 10% discount. (valid until 01.04.14)